Making the Revolution Work for You

In a recent Microbiology Mini-Review, Meriel Jones catalogs both the potential benefits and problems that arise from fungal genome sequencing. Using the nine genomes (being) sequenced from the Aspergillus clade, Jones addresses several issues tied to a singular theme: if we are to unlock the potential that fungal genome sequencing holds, both academically and entrepreneurially, then a more robust infrastructure that enables comparative and functional annotation of genomes must be established.

Fortunately, like any good awareness advocate, Jones points us in the direction of e-Fungi, a UK based virtual project aimed at setting up such an infrastructure. Anyone can navigate this database to either compare the stored genomic information or evaluate any fungus of interest in the light of the e-Fungi genomic data. The data appears to be precomputed, similar to IMG from JGI, so there are inherent limitations on the data that one can obtain. However, tools such as these put important data in the hands of expert mycologists that can turn the information into something biologically meaningful.

As Jones points out, this is just the beginning. If fungal genomes are to live up to their promise, they must engage more than just experts at reading genomes.

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