Evolving a new pathway

A paper* this week from the Huffnagle lab argues that even though the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can produce an oxylipin similar to prostaglandin, the authors were unable to identify any homologous cyclooxygenase genes in the genome. They showed through LC-MS-MS on supernatants from C. neoformans cells grown on arachidonic acid that molecules with activity similar to prostaglandin E2 are synthesized. BLAST searches of the genome could not identify any similar genes to cyclooxygenase genes including the PPo genes from Aspergillus which contain catalytic domains similar to mammalian cyclooxygenases.

So did C. neoformans evolve a new way to synthesize this enzyme which may act as a hormone and affect the host’s immune system? My cursory searches against other basidiomycete genomes did turn up homologs to these PPo genes in Ustilago and Coprinus so perhaps the enyzmes in the pathway have changed in the Cryptococcus lineage. Perhaps searches with protein structure of cyclooxygenases could pick up functionaly similar genes which would serve as good candidates which have little sequence similarity to the cannonical protein determined in humans.

* Paid access required for 6 months.

Leave a Reply