Evolution of PEX genes

A nice evolutionary analysis of peroxin genes entitled PEX Genes in Fungal Genomes: Common, Rare, or Redundant in the journal “Traffic” from Kiel et al out of the University of Groningen in The Netherlands. Within a species, the genes in the PEX family are not necessarily phylogenetically related to each other, but instead are all named as to how they were discovered in mutant screens, most of which were done in S. cerevisiae.

Peroxisomes are interesting because they are necessary for some biochemical reactions (fatty acid metabolism). In filamentous fungi there are additionally specialized peroxisomes called Woronin bodies that plug the septal pore that separates individuals cells in a hyphae. These are specific to filamentous fungi so it is interesting to contrast the numbers and types of genes in the PEX family that are present as determined from the genome sequences. To relate this to human biology, the authors suggest that understanding the complex phenotypes of human peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) will be helped through the study of the disruptions of PEX genes in various filamentous fungi. Interestingly, they find that nearly all PEX genes are present in all fungi, yeast and filamentous alike, although there may be additional genes unidentified.

Woronin bodies
Woronin bodies in A. nidulans from Momany et al, Mycologia 2002

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