Fusarium graminearum genome published

The genome of the wheat and cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum was published in Science this week in an article entitled “The Fusarium graminearum Genome Reveals a Link Between Localized Polymorphism and Pathogen Specializationtion”. The project was a collaboration of many different Fusarium research groups. The genome sequencing was spearheaded by the Broad Institute at Harvard and MIT and is part of a larger project to sequence several different species of Fusarium. The group sequenced a second strain in order to identify polymorphisms.

Some of the key findings

  • The presence of Repeat Induced point-mutation (RIP) has likely limited the amount of repetitive and duplicated sequences in the genome
  • Most of the genes unique to F. graminearum (and thus not present in 4 other Fusarium spp genomes) are found in the telomeres
  • Between the sequenced strains SNP density ranged from 0 to 17.5 polymorphisms per kb.
  • Some of the genes expressed uniquely during plant infection (408 total) include known virulence factors and many plant cell-wall degrading enzymes.
  • The genes showing some of the highest SNP diversity tended to be unique to Fusarium and often unique to F. graminearum

One thought on “Fusarium graminearum genome published”

  1. There are so much interesting data available known for pathogens that I think it would be interesting to pool some of this data together (gene expression upon infection, comparative genomics, pathogen-host protein interactions, structural information) to come up with general observations about the evolution of pathogen-host interactions. Never enough time 😉

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