Genome survey sequencing of Witches’ Broom

Genome survey sequencing (1.9X coverage) was generated for Moniliophthora perniciosa, the cause of witches’ broom disease on cacao plants. The sequence for this basidiomycete plant pathogen was published in BMC Genomics this week. The authors report a higher number of ROS metabolism and P450 genes. Evaluating whether these copy number differences are significantly different from other basidiomycete fungi and are lineage specific expansions will help determine if these families played a role in the adaptation of this plant pathogen.

This work provides an important stepping stone in understanding and eventually controlling this pathogen which is devastating cacao plantations. An associated review describes what we have and can learn about Witches’ broom disease.

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Jorge MC Mondego, Marcelo F Carazzolle, Gustavo GL Costa, Eduardo F Formighieri, Lucas P Parizzi, Johana Rincones, Carolina Cotomacci, Dirce M Carraro, Anderson F Cunha, Helaine Carrer, Ramon O Vidal, Raissa C Estrela, Odalys Garcia, Daniela PT Thomazella, Bruno V de Oliveira, Acassia BL Pires, Maria Carolina S Rio, Marcos Renato R Araujo, Marcos H de Moraes, Luis AB Castro, Karina P Gramacho, Marilda S Goncalves, Jose P Moura Neto, Aristoteles Goes Neto, Luciana V Barbosa, Mark J Guiltinan, Bryan A Bailey, Lyndel W Meinhardt, Julio CM Cascardo, Goncalo AG Pereira (2008). A genome survey of Moniliophthora perniciosa gives new insights into Witches’ Broom Disease of cacao BMC Genomics, 9 (1) DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-9-548

Melampsora larici-populina genome sequenced

From Francis Martin

The DNA sequence of Melampsora larici-populina has been determined by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI). Annotations of the v1.0 assembly of Melampsora laricis-populina are publicly available at http://www.jgi.doe.gov/Melampsora.
Genome analyses have been carried out by an international consortium comprised of DOE JGI, France’s National Institute for Agricultural Research (F Martin et al., INRA-Nancy), Canadian Forest Service (R Hamelin et al., Laurentian Forestry Centre), and the Bioinformatics & Evolutionary Genomics Division (Rouzé et al., Gent University) in Belgium.

The poplar leaf rust fungus Melampsora is the most devastating and widespread pathogen of poplars, and has limited the use of poplars for environmental and wood production goals in many parts of the world. All known poplar cultivars are susceptible to Melampsora species, and new virulent strains are continuously developing. This disease therefore has a strong potential impact on current and future poplar plantations used for production of forest products (principally pulp and consolidated wood products), carbon sequestration, biofuels production, and bioremediation.