Vote for your favorite plant pathogenic fungus

Molecular Plant Pathology (twitter: MPPjournal) is engaging the community to vote for their favorite plant pathogenic fungus. Below is info requesting your vote.

As a member of the MPP community we would like you to take part in a fun but informative vote.

We aim to publish a Review detailing the top 10 plant pathogenic fungi worldwide, and we need your help.

Please could you list 3 fungi you feel should be in the top 10.
There is no need to rank them. Please state after the name whether it is for
scientific impact (SI) or economic impact (EI).

An example might be…

Magnaporthe grisea (SI/EI)
Melampsora lini (SI)
Botrytis cinerea (EI)

We will rank all the entries to compile a list. We will then find authors to write a short piece (1/2 page or so) on each one, introducing the pathogen and explaining its importance. This Review will be published in MPP for people to use, comment upon and discuss.

We hope you will take part, it will only take a few seconds of your time.

Please send your vote to diane.hird[AT]bristol.ac.uk by 11th February at the latest.

Feel free to pass on this email to any colleagues or co-workers as the more votes we get the better. Many thanks

Best wishes
Diane

-------------------------------
Dr Diane Hird
Journal Administrator
Molecular Plant Pathology
School of Biological Sciences
University of Bristol
Woodland Road
Bristol, BS8 1UG, UK

Tel/Fax: +44 (0)117 331 7021
Email: diane.hird[AT]bristol.ac.uk

Postdoc for Fungal genome data integration

There is an open position in my lab to support development of FungiDB, a database for fungal genome data integration.

Postdoctoral fellow supporting fungal genome database development

Position Description

A postdoc position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Jason Stajich to support the development of FungiDB, a database for fungal genomic and functional data.   Strong candidates will be proficient in the Perl programming language; modern biology in general and bioinformatics in particular; show a demonstrated ability to quickly pick up new biology and computer science concepts; be comfortable using relational databases; and possess core Unix skills to do these tasks efficiently.  Experience using Perl for genome sequence data processing a plus.

You’ll also have a relentless attention to detail, the ability to work independently on challenging problems with no direct easy solution.  You will use these skills to help organize, analyze, and display a vast amount of disparate biological data and interact with the fungal community. There will be opportunities for self-directed research utilizing this collection of genomics and comparative database and tools.

Application evaluation will begin Feb 1, 2011 until the position is filled. Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience and University of California Postdoctoral Union agreement.

Qualifications

Minimum qualifications include a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, Computer Science, Statistics, or a related field. Demonstrated experience in bioinformatics and high proficiency in Perl programming is required.  Demonstrated experience in web or bioinformatics software development is a plus. The ability to work with a small, distributed team is essential including exceptional written and verbal communication skills.

To Apply

Contact Jason Stajich jason.stajich@ucr.edu with a CV and the names of three references letter writers.

Information available on UC Riverside and the Stajich lab.

Information about UCR
In the Heart of Inland Southern California, UC Riverside is located on nearly 1,200 acres near Box Springs Mountain in Southern California, the park-like campus provides convenient access to the vibrant and growing Inland region. The campus is a living laboratory for the exploration of issues critical to growing communities — air, water, energy, transportation, politics, the arts, history and culture. UCR gives every student the resources to explore, engage, imagine and excel.

At UC Riverside we celebrate diversity and are proud of our #5 ranking among the nation’s for most diverse universities (US News and World Report 2010). Become part of a place that fosters success for all its constituents, students, faculty, and staff, and where work/life balance and campus culture are integral to our way of life.
UCR is ranked 43rd among top public universities (US News and World Report 2010).

UCR is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer with a commitment to workforce diversity.

AA/EOE

 

Microsporidia genomes on the way

New genomes from Microsporidia are on the way from the Broad Institute and other groups, and will be a boon to those working on these fascinating creatures. Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of eukaryotic cells and many can cause serious disease in humans. Some parasitize worms and insects too. The evolutionary placement of these species in the fungi is still debated with recent evidence placing them as derived members of the Mucormycotina based on shared synteny (conserved gene order), in particular around the mating type locus.  There is still some debate as to where this group belongs in the Fungal kingdom, with their highly derived characteristics and long branches they are still make them hard to place.  The synteny-based evidence was another way to find a phylogenetic placement for them but it would be helpful to have additional support in the form of additional shared derived characteristics that group Mucormycotina and Microsporidia. There is hope that increased number of genome sequences and phylogenomic approaches can help resolve the placement and more further understand the evolution of the group.

For data analysis, a new genome database for comparing these genomes is online called MicrosporidiaDB. This project has begun incorporating the available genomes and providing a data mining interface that extends from the EuPathDB project.