Category Archives: speciation

Cryptococcus species deliniation

ResearchBlogging.org What delineates species boundaries in fungi? Much work has been done on biological and phylogenetic species concepts in fungi. Some concepts are reviewed in Taylor et al 2006 and in Taylor et al 2000, and applications can be seen in several pathogens such as Paraccocidiodies, Coccidioides, and the model filamentous (non-pathogenic) fungus Neurospora.

A paper in Fungal Genetics and Biology on species definitions in Cryptococcus neoformans from multi-locus sequencing seeks to provide additional treatment of the observed diversity. A large study of 117 Cryptococcus isolates were examined through multi-locus sequencing (6 loci) and identified two monophyletic lineages within C. neoformans varieties that correspond to var. neoformans and var. grubii. However within the C. gattii samples they identified four monophyletic groups consistent with deep divergences observed from whole genome trees for two strains of C. gattii, MLST, and AFLP studies. By first defining species, we can now test whether any of the species groups have different traits including prevalence in clinical settings and in nature.

BOVERS, M., HAGEN, F., KURAMAE, E., BOEKHOUT, T. (2007). Six monophyletic lineages identified within Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii by multi-locus sequence typing. Fungal Genetics and Biology DOI: 10.1016/j.fgb.2007.12.004

Neurospora speciation through experimental evolution

ResearchBlogging.orgDettman, Anderson, and Kohn recently published a paper in BMC Evolutionary Biology on reproductive experimental evolution in two Neurospora crassa populations evolved under different selective conditions. This is a great study that complements work published last year in Nature on experimental evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations. Neurospora populations were evolved under high salt and low temperature and were started from either high diversity (interspecific crosses, N. crassa vs N. intermedia) or low diversity (intraspecific cross, two N. crassa isolates D143 (Louisiana, USA)and D69 (Ivory Coast)) as described in Figure 1. The experimentally evolved populations were then tested for asexual and sexual fitness (they were taken through complete meiotic cycle throughout the experiment to avoid insure there was selection on the sexual reproduction pathway.

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Proteins Evolve Differentially in Saccharomyces

Blogging about Peer-Reviewed ResearchPerhaps not a surprise to anyone that has dabbled in evolutionary analysis of proteins, Kawahara and Imanishi (BMC Evolutionary Biology 2007) confirm that not every protein evolves via a molecular clock in Saccharomyces sensu scricto. Using everyone’s favorite evolutionary tool, PAML, the authors identify protein lineages via a whole genome scan that evolve relatively slow or fast compared to the rest of the clade. Some changes even appear to be due to the invisible hand of natural selection and independent of the complications that may have arisen during the whole genome duplication in the ancestor of this clade.

It has been previously speculated that, either upon protein duplication or change in the selective regime of the environment, a protein may rapidly evolve at speciation and then, upon obtaining a new, important function, slow down it’s evolutionary rate to a clock-like tempo. One of the black boxes in this hypothesis is whether or not closely related proteins can rapidly diverge. While the authors are not able to identify a mechanism explaining how, their study demonstrates the plausibility of this hypothesis. However, it remains uncertain if proteins that exhibit rapid divergence will subsequently slow down their evolutionary rate later in time.

It’s good to see evolutionary analysis being applied to fungal genomes. With so many sequenced species spanning a great range of phylogenetic distance, the fungal kingdom is poised to provide great insight into the evolution of eukaryotes.

Mystery in the mechanism of yeast speciation

A paper in PLoS Genetics studied what happens when individual chromosomes of S. cerevisiae are replaced with a homologous copy its sister species, S. paradoxus. Previous work from Ken Wolfe’s lab interpreted the differential loss of genes after the whole genome duplication in the Saccharomyces lineage played a role in speciation among the yeast species. Surprisingly (or not, depending on how you interpret the previous work) Greig did not find any lethality in haploid F1 offspring from a diploid synthetically constructed individuals. Certainly this is not the last word but it represents a nice experimental screen to identify interacting genotypes. What would be interesting in followup work would be more subtle dissection of epistatic interactions among the genes on the different chromosomes to score phenotypes other than complete inviability. This might help understand what pathways are operating differently.

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