Category Archives: oomycete

WRIFO: Women Researchers in Fungi & Oomycetes

In an effort to promote the diversity of women in fungal and oomycete biology research we started a list of Women Researchers in Fungi & Oomycetes (#WRIFO) in our fields. We hope this will make it easier for conference, seminar and award committees to consider a broad pool of candidates when inviting speakers or nominating individuals.

We seeded the WRIFO list with 150 women whose research we know or who were suggested by colleagues, but it is by no means complete. Please add names and add missing details to those already on the list. The WRIFO list is available as a google spreadsheet here (shortlink: http://s.fungidb.org/1SU45hk ). As an experiment in community dynamics WRIFO is an open sheet for editing. We will change this to “make comment-only” after a time to try to avoid getting overrun with spam. If you cannot add to the WRIFO list directly, comments on this post are accepted. However direct adding is preferred to avoid losing track of any suggestions.

As a test for how many will read directions:

  1. Please add new entries at the end of the sheet rather than trying to insert alphabetically.  You can always re-sort the sheet by last name after entries are made
  2. List institution, include 2 letter country code in parentheses.
  3. Select region from the available options.
  4. Pick up to two general research areas from the drop down lists.
  5. Add specific Keywords for research.  Make these as general as possible–a meeting organizer is much more likely to search “cytoskeleton”, than “tyrosinylated microtubules.”
  6. Include a laboratory website link. Use publicly available websites that do not require memberships to view
  7. Select the classification of career stage. Mapping this to job titles in the US
    • Junior: Assistant Professor, Assistant Research Scientist, or equivalent
    • Intermediate: Associate Professor, Associate Research Scientist,  or equivalent
    • Senior: Full Professor, Research Scientist or equivalent
    • Emeritus

–Michelle Momany (@mcmomany) & Jason Stajich (@hyphaltip)

Update 1: A landing page was made for info on WRIFO and where archive and Excel versions of the spreadsheet will be made available.

Postdoc in Phytophthora cell biology and genetics

Positions are available at the University of California, Riverside (USA) to study Phytophthora infestans, the fungus-like oomycete that causes the late blight diseases of potato and tomato.  The projects involve a mixture of cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, proteomics, and bioinformatics and focus on:

1. Cell cycle regulators and Phytophthora sporulation.  We have identified cell cycle regulators that play important roles in spore formation and germination.  Mechanisms of their subcellular targeting and function will be studied through immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, and protein-protein interaction studies.

2. Phytophthora traits relevant to pathogenesis.  Goals include determining how plant nutrients are assimilated by P. infestans, and mechanisms of resistance to fungicides.  The work will involve a combination of molecular genetics, high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics, and cell biology.

3.  Transcriptional networks in Phytophthora growth and pathogenicity.  This project focuses on characterizing transcription factors that regulate the life and disease cycles, and will involve biochemical, genetic, and bioinformatic approaches.

Funding is available for up to three years, available immediately. We are looking for talented and motivated individuals that have an interest in oomycetes or fungi, microbial/plant development or physiology, or plant-pathogen interactions.  Those experienced with immunoelectron microscopy, confocal microscopy, or transcription factor purification are especially encouraged to apply.

Additional information about the lab is at: http://oomyceteworld.net/.  Our park-like university campus in sunny southern California is located near three diverse environments: ocean, desert, and mountains.

For more information or to apply, please contact: Howard Judelson (howard.judelson@ucr.edu), Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA.  If you send an email attachment, please label it with your name.

Ireland’s blight and Puccinia update

Hyphoid logic points out that it is appropriate to discuss about the oomycete Phytophthora infestans on St. Patrick’s Day and mentions a NYT article “The fungus that conquered Europe” that is worth a look.

It is also worth thinking about another blight, well rust, that is spreading through the middle east and could threaten wheat crops worldwide. New Scientist has excellent coverage of Puccinia graminis strain Ug99 which is spreading faster than expected due to a cyclone that spread the rust spores into Iran two years earlier than expected.

Related posts from last year. “Fungus could cause a food shortage”, “Puccinia black stem rust disease spreading”