Tag Archives: comparative genomics

Postdoc: Comparative genomics and bioinformatics

Postdoc position in comparative genomics and bioinformatics

Applications are invited for a bioinformatics postdoctoral position in ?the research group of Laszlo G Nagy (Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary). We are now looking to hire new people with a background in bioinformatics, phylogenetics or fungal evolution. The Lab offers excellent training opportunities in fungal comparative genomics, cutting edge projects, abundant funding, an inspiring atmosphere and extensive collaborator network.

The primary focus of the lab is understanding the general principles of convergent evolution and fungal multicellularity through comparative genomics, transcriptomics and single-cell transcriptomics of multicellular fruiting bodies in Basidiomycetes. Fruiting bodies represent some of the most complex morphological structures found in fungi, yet, their developmental and evolutionary origins are hardly known. Complex fruiting bodies have evolved independently several times in the Basidiomycetes, offering an excellent model system to study the genetic mechanisms of convergent evolution.

The successful Candidate has:

  • PhD in bioinformatics, evolutionary biology, mycology or other relevant field
  • Experience in genomics, Perl and/or Python scripting
  • Good team player traits
  • Experience in working with fungi is a plus

Contact and application – The starting date of the project is September 2015. The position will last for one year with the possibility of extension up to 4 years. If interested, send a motivation letter along with your CV to Laszlo Nagy (lnagy@brc.hu).


Dr. Laszlo Nagy
Fungal Evolution & Genomics Lab
Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Institute of Biochemistry
Biological Research Center, HAS
Hungary

http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/sysbiol/nagy-laszlo-lab-index.html

Postdoc: Fungal Comparative and Population Genomics

The Corradi Lab is currently seeking a Postdoctoral Fellow in the field of Fungal Comparative and Population Genomics. The research will be led by Dr. Nicolas Corradi and carried out in a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) – affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

The position will be initially funded for one year, with the possibility of renewal for up to three years depending on performance. The candidate is expected to contribute to several ongoing projects that focus on the population genomics of two evolutionary unrelated groups of fungi: the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and the Microsporidia. Enquiries about specific projects can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Applicants are expected to have a background in comparative genomics or populations genomics. A strong experience in either Population Genetics, Environmental Genomics, Metagenomics, or ab-initio gene annotation and programming will be seen as an strong asset for the final selection of the candidate. Basic knowledge of Linux is required.

A complete application package includes a CV, a one-page description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. Evaluation of applications starts immediately and will continue until a suitable candidate is found.

The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40.000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city (http://www.science.uottawa.ca/fac/welcome.html). Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life (http://www.ottawatourism.ca/fr/)

Applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Representative publications:

  •  Riley R. et al. 2014. Extreme Diversification of the MATA-HMG Gene Family in the Plant – Associated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. New Phytologist. 201: 254–268
  •  James T.Y et al. 2013. Shared signatures of parasitism and phylogenomics unite the Cryptomycota and Microsporidia. Current Biology. 23 (16), 1548–1553
  • Tisserant E. et al. The arbuscular mycorrhizal Glomus genome provides insights into the evolution of the oldest plant symbiosis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences – USA. 110 (50), 20117-20122R576-R577
  •  Pombert J.F. et al. 2012. Gain and loss of multiple functionally-related horizontally transferred genes in the reduced genomes of two microsporidian parasites. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences – USA 109(31):12638-43
  •  Selman M. et al. 2011. Acquisition of an animal gene by two microsporidia. 2011. Current Biology 21: R576-R577

Job: Junior Group Leader Functional Genetics and Genomics of Fungi

Job Advertisement Junior Group Leader – Ref. #01-13001

The Senckenberg Society has an international reputation in all fields of Natural History research. It runs six research institutes and two museums in Germany and is also custodian of the UNESCO World Heritage Site at Messel.

From 1st of April 2013 we are looking for a

Junior Research Group Leader in Functional Genetics and Genomics of Fungi in the framework of a government funded LOEWE excellence cluster in “Integrative Fungal Research (IPF)” in Frankfurt am Main.

We are looking for an individual whose research will be adding significantly to the research aims of the LOEWE excellence cluster “Integrative Fungal Research”. The cluster includes researchers in mycology from Goethe-University Frankfurt a.M., Justus-Liebig-University Gießen, Philipps-University Marburg, University Kassel and the Senckenberg Society. The aim of the LOEWE excellence cluster will be to synergistically tie together the basic research areas of biodiversity research, molecular genetics, and genomics with translational research in biochemistry and biotechnology. Thus, the research cluster offers an ideal environment for scientific development and profiling.

Salary and benefits are according to a public service position in Germany (TV-H E14). The position is limited to three years, with the possibility of extension for two years in case of positive evaluation. Senckenberg advocates gender equality. Women and other underrepresented groups are therefore strongly encouraged to apply. The possibility of academic development (Habilitation, equivalent to assistant/associate professor) will be given.

Apart from the salary of the group leader, a competitive core funding for instrumentation, running costs and personnel will be provided.

Research expertise in the areas of comparative genomics and transcriptomics, annotation of metabolic pathways and regulatory networks, or systems biology of fungi or oomycetes are particularly welcome. Applicants should have an international track record and have demonstrated their ability to develop innovative ideas in their field of research. Previous experience with independent research is a plus but not mandatory. A record in third party funding acquisition is an advantage; willingness to acquire funding through research proposals is required.

Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications including a cover letter, CV, statement of research achievements, future research proposal (only one page, each), certificates (PhD, MSc, BSc, or similar) and the names of three scientists who could provide references. Applications should be submitted in a single PDF file by E-Mail to recruiting@senckenberg.de. Closing date for application is: January, 31th 2013

Enquiries about the LOEWE excellence cluster Integrative Fungal Research and regarding the position please contact directly Prof. Dr. Marco Thines (thines@bio.uni-frankfurt.de).

Flier

Still time to sign up for EMBO Comparative Genomics meeting

[via Teun Boekhout]

This year looks like another great lineup of speakers for the EMBO Comparative Genomics of Microorganisms: ‘Understanding the Complexity of Diversity’ 15-20 Oct 2011 Sant Feliu de Guixols, Spain.

Andrew Allen J. Craig Venter Institute US
Anders Blomberg Göteborg University SE
Chris Bowler École Normale Supérieure FR
Gertraud Burger University of Montreal CA
Bernard Dujon Institut Pasteur FR
Toni Gabaldón CRG, Barcelona ES
Ursula Goodenough Washington University US
Michael Gray Dalhousie University CA
Joseph Heitman Duke University US
Christiane Hertz-Fowler University of Liverpool UK
Regine Kahmann Max Planck Institute DE
Patrick Keeling University of British Columbia CA
Nicole King UC, Berkeley US
Edda Klipp Humboldt University DE
Veronique Leh Louis University of Strasbourg FR
Jan Pawlowski University of Geneva CH
Jure Piskur Lund University SE
Tom Richards University of Exeter UK
Andrew J. Roger Dalhousie University CA
David Roos University of Pennsylvania US
Iñaki Ruiz-Trillo University of Barcelona ES
Joseph Schacherer University of Strasbourg FR
Artur Scherf Institut Pasteur FR
Joey Spatafora Oregon State University US
Nicholas Talbot University of Exeter UK
Kevin Verstrepen University of Leuven BE
Eric Westhof University of Strasbourg FR
Patrick Wincker Genoscope FR
Ken Wolfe Smurfit Institute of Genetics IE
Alexandra Z. Worden University of California US

Some comments from former participants:

Comments from 2009 meeting

Overall rating

Based on responses from 80% of participants:

Excellent 50%; Very Good 44%; Good 6%.

 

Comments:

It is hard to improve the meeting. It’s a good mixture of conference and workshop with a lot of input from expert of adjacent field.

I strongly support the idea the meeting is organized in the future at a regular basis.

Very high quality, open minded with presentations ranging from pure genomics to implementation in the field of ecology; plenty of novelties. Plenty of time to discuss and to establish potential collaborations

I hope to have the possibility to go in the future to this meeting. We learn a lot, and also the size is well, the students have the possibility to talk of discuss with senior

Great work!

Thanks to the organizers for an extremely interesting and productive meeting.

Great meeting. This is a unique meeting because it brings together a group of scientists that dont normally interact with each other. Thus, great opportunities for cross-interactions. This meeting has the potential to fill a very unique niche. I enjoyed meeting new people from diverse fields. I plan to attend again and encourage my colleagues to do so.

This meeting was a great match to my interests but also challenged me to think outside of my normal sphere.  I applaud the organizers and the participants in making this a useful meeting.

The meeting was very well organized and at a very good location. I enjoyed it very much.

I hope this meeting continues as it was a valuable forum for the field of comparative genomics.

This meeting is unique in its broad organism focus. Please keep supporting it.

EMBO Conference: Comparative Genomics Of Eukaryotic Microorganisms 2011

Announcing an upcoming conference in October.
Comparative Genomics Of Eukaryotic Microorganisms: Understanding The Complexity Of Diversity

It will be held in Sant Feliux, Spain October  15-20, 2011. The website has more details including an impressive slate of speakers.

I can attest to it being a great meeting from my attendance 2 years ago. A great venue and excellent speakers and plenty of time to linger and discuss ideas and research over meals and coffee breaks.

 

Presents for the holidays – Plant pathogen genomes

Though a bit cliche, I think the metaphor of “presents under the tree” of some new plant pathogen genomes summarized in 4 recent publications is still too good to resist.  There are 4 papers in this week’s Science that will certainly make a collection of plant pathogen biologists very happy. There are also treats for the general purpose genome biologists with descriptions of next generation/2nd generation sequencing technologies, assembly methods, and comparative genomics. Much more inside these papers than I am summarizing so I urge you to take look if you have access to these pay-for-view articles or contact the authors for reprints to get a copy.

Hyaloperonospora

These include the genome of biotrophic oomycete and Arabidopsis pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Baxter et al). While preserving the health of Arabidopsis is not a major concern of most researchers, this is an excellent model system for studying plant-microbe interaction.  The genome sequence of Hpa provides a look at specialization as a biotroph. The authors found a reduction (relative to other oomycete species) in factors related to host-targeted degrading enzymes and also reduction in necrosis factors suggesting the specialization in biotrophic lifestyle from a necrotrophic ancestor. Hpa also does not make zoospores with flagella like its relatives and sequence searches for 90 flagella-related genes turned up no identifiable homologs.

While the technical aspects of sequencing are less glamourous now the authors used Sanger and Illumina sequencing to complete this genome at 45X sequencing coverage and an estimated genome size fo 80 Mb. To produce the assembly they used Velvet on the paired end Illumina data to produce a 56Mb assembly and PCAP (8X coverage to produce a 70Mb genome) on the Sanger reads to produce two assemblies that were merged with an ad hoc procedure that relied on BLAT to scaffold and link contigs through the two assembled datasets. They used CEGMA and several in-house pipelines to annotate the genes in this assembly. SYNTENY analysis was completed with PHRINGE. A relatively large percentage (17%) of the genome fell into ‘Unknown repetitive sequence’ that is unclassified – larger than P.sojae (12%) but there remain a lot of mystery elements of unknown function in these genomes.  If you jump ahead to the Blumeria genome article you’ll see this is still peanuts compared to that Blumeria’s genome (64%). The largest known transposable element family in Hpa was the LTR/Gypsy element. Of interest to some following oomycete literature is the relative abundance of the RLXR containing proteins which are typically effectors – there were still quite a few (~150 instead of ~500 see in some Phytophora genomes).

Blumeria

 

A second paper on the genome of the barley powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei and two close relatives Erysiphe pisi, a pea pathogen, and Golovinomyces orontii, an Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen (Spanu et al).  These are Ascomycetes in the Leotiomycete class where there are only a handful of genomes Overall this paper tells a story told about how obligate biotrophy has shaped the genome. I found most striking was depicted in Figure 1. It shows that typical genome size for (so far sampled) Pezizomycotina Ascomycetes in the ~40-50Mb range whereas these powdery mildew genomes here significantly large genomes in ~120-160 Mb range. These large genomes were primarily comprised of Transposable Elements (TE) with ~65% of the genome containing TE. However the protein coding gene content is still only on the order of ~6000 genes, which is actually quite low for a filamentous Ascomycete, suggesting that despite genome expansion the functional potential shows signs of reduction.  The obligate lifestyle of the powdery mildews suggested that the species had lost some autotrophic genes and the authors further cataloged a set of ~100 genes which are missing in the mildews but are found in the core ascomycete genomes. They also document other genome cataloging results like only a few secondary metabolite genes although these are typically in much higher copy numbers in other filamentous ascomycetes (e.g. Aspergillus).  I still don’t have a clear picture of how this gene content differs from their closest sequenced neighbors, the other Leotiomycetes Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotium, are on the order of 12-14k genes. Since the E. pisi and G. orontii data is not yet available in GenBank or the MPI site it is hard to figure this out just yet – I presume it will be available soon.

More techie details — The authors used Sanger and second generation technologies and utilized the Celera assembler to build the assemblies from 120X coverage sequence from a hybrid of sequencing technologies.  Interestingly, for the E. pisi and G. orontii assemblies the MPI site lists the genome sizes closer to 65Mb in the first drafts of the assembly with 454 data so I guess you can see what happens when the Newbler assembler which overcollapses repeats. They also used a customized automated annotation with some ab intio gene finders (not sure if there was custom training or not for the various gene finders) and estimated the coverage with the CEGMA genes. I do think a Fungal-Specific set of core-conserved genes would be in order here as a better comparison set – some nice data like this already exist in a few databases but would be interesting to see if CEGMA represents a broad enough core-set to estimate genome coverage vs a Fungal-derived CEGMA-like set.

 

A third paper in this issue covers the genome evolution in the massively successful pathogen Phytophora infestans through resequencing of six genomes of related species to track recent evolutionary history of the pathogen (Raffaele et al). The authors used high throughput Illumina sequencing to sequence genomes of closely related species. They found a variety differences among genes in the pathogen among the findings “genes in repeat-rich regions show[ed] higher rates of structural polymorphisms and positive selection”. They found 14% of the genes experienced positive selection and these included many (300 out of ~800) of the annotated effector genes. P. infestans also showed high rates of change in the repeat rich regions which is also where a lot of the disease implicated genes are locating supporting the hypothesis that the repeat driven expansion of the genome (as described in the 2009 genome paper). The paper generates a lot of very nice data for followup by helping to prioritize the genes with fast rates of evolution or profiles that suggest they have been shaped by recent adaptive evolutionary forces and are candidates for the mechanisms of pathogenecity in this devastating plant pathogen.

 

A fourth paper describes the genome sequencing of Sporisorium reilianum, a biotrophic pathogen that is closely related species to corn smut Ustilago maydis (Schirawski et al). Both these species both infect maize hosts but while U. maydis induces tumors in the ears, leaves, tassels of corn the S. reilianum infection is limited to tassels and . The authors used comparative biology and genome sequencing to try and tease out what genetic components may be responsible for the phenotypic differences. The comparison revealed a relative syntentic genome but also found 43 regions in U. maydis that represent highly divergent sequence between the species. These regions contained disproportionate number of secreted proteins indicating that these secreted proteins have been evolving at a much faster rate and that they may be important for the distinct differences in the biology. The chromosome ends of U. maydis were also found to contain up to 20 additional genes in the sub-telomeric regions that were unique to U. maydis. Another fantastic finding that this sequencing and comparison revealed is more about the history of the lack of RNAi genes in U. maydis. It was a striking feature from the 2006 genome sequence that the genome lacked a functioning copy of Dicer. However knocking out this gene in S. reilianum failed to show a developmental or virulence phenotype suggesting it is dispensible for those functions so I think there will be some followups to explore (like do either of these species make small RNAs, do they produce any that are translocated to the host, etc).  The rest of the analyses covered in the manuscript identify the specific loci that are different between the two species — interestingly a lot of the identified loci were the same ones found as islands of secreted proteins in the first genome analysis paper so the comparative approach was another way to get to the genes which may be important for the virulence if the two organisms have different phenotypes. This is certainly the approach that has also been take in other plant pathogens (e.g. Mycosphaerella, Fusarium) and animal pathogens (Candida, Cryptococcus, Coccidioides) but requires a sampling species or appropriate distance that that the number of changes haven’t saturated our ability to reconstruct the history either at the gene order/content or codon level.

Without the comparison of an outgroup species it is impossible to determine if U. maydis gained function that relates to the phenotypes observed here through these speculated evolutionary changes involving new genes and newly evolved functions or if S. reilianum lost functionality that was present in their common ancestor. However, this paper is an example of how using a comparative approach can identify testable hypotheses for origins of pathogenecity genes.

 

Hope everyone has a chance to enjoy holidays and unwrap and spend some time looking at these and other science gems over the coming weeks.

 

Baxter, L., Tripathy, S., Ishaque, N., Boot, N., Cabral, A., Kemen, E., Thines, M., Ah-Fong, A., Anderson, R., Badejoko, W., Bittner-Eddy, P., Boore, J., Chibucos, M., Coates, M., Dehal, P., Delehaunty, K., Dong, S., Downton, P., Dumas, B., Fabro, G., Fronick, C., Fuerstenberg, S., Fulton, L., Gaulin, E., Govers, F., Hughes, L., Humphray, S., Jiang, R., Judelson, H., Kamoun, S., Kyung, K., Meijer, H., Minx, P., Morris, P., Nelson, J., Phuntumart, V., Qutob, D., Rehmany, A., Rougon-Cardoso, A., Ryden, P., Torto-Alalibo, T., Studholme, D., Wang, Y., Win, J., Wood, J., Clifton, S., Rogers, J., Van den Ackerveken, G., Jones, J., McDowell, J., Beynon, J., & Tyler, B. (2010). Signatures of Adaptation to Obligate Biotrophy in the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Genome Science, 330 (6010), 1549-1551 DOI: 10.1126/science.1195203

Spanu, P., Abbott, J., Amselem, J., Burgis, T., Soanes, D., Stuber, K., Loren van Themaat, E., Brown, J., Butcher, S., Gurr, S., Lebrun, M., Ridout, C., Schulze-Lefert, P., Talbot, N., Ahmadinejad, N., Ametz, C., Barton, G., Benjdia, M., Bidzinski, P., Bindschedler, L., Both, M., Brewer, M., Cadle-Davidson, L., Cadle-Davidson, M., Collemare, J., Cramer, R., Frenkel, O., Godfrey, D., Harriman, J., Hoede, C., King, B., Klages, S., Kleemann, J., Knoll, D., Koti, P., Kreplak, J., Lopez-Ruiz, F., Lu, X., Maekawa, T., Mahanil, S., Micali, C., Milgroom, M., Montana, G., Noir, S., O’Connell, R., Oberhaensli, S., Parlange, F., Pedersen, C., Quesneville, H., Reinhardt, R., Rott, M., Sacristan, S., Schmidt, S., Schon, M., Skamnioti, P., Sommer, H., Stephens, A., Takahara, H., Thordal-Christensen, H., Vigouroux, M., Wessling, R., Wicker, T., & Panstruga, R. (2010). Genome Expansion and Gene Loss in Powdery Mildew Fungi Reveal Tradeoffs in Extreme Parasitism Science, 330 (6010), 1543-1546 DOI: 10.1126/science.1194573

Raffaele, S., Farrer, R., Cano, L., Studholme, D., MacLean, D., Thines, M., Jiang, R., Zody, M., Kunjeti, S., Donofrio, N., Meyers, B., Nusbaum, C., & Kamoun, S. (2010). Genome Evolution Following Host Jumps in the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen Lineage Science, 330 (6010), 1540-1543 DOI: 10.1126/science.1193070

Schirawski, J., Mannhaupt, G., Munch, K., Brefort, T., Schipper, K., Doehlemann, G., Di Stasio, M., Rossel, N., Mendoza-Mendoza, A., Pester, D., Muller, O., Winterberg, B., Meyer, E., Ghareeb, H., Wollenberg, T., Munsterkotter, M., Wong, P., Walter, M., Stukenbrock, E., Guldener, U., & Kahmann, R. (2010). Pathogenicity Determinants in Smut Fungi Revealed by Genome Comparison Science, 330 (6010), 1546-1548 DOI: 10.1126/science.1195330

A cacophony of comparative genomics papers

A nice series of comparative genomics articles have been published in the last few weeks. The pace of genome sequencing has accelerated to the point that we have lots of sequencing projects coming from individual labs and small consortia not necessarily from genome centers. We are seeing a preview of what next (2nd) generation sequencing will enable and can start to imagine what happens when even cheaper 3rd generation sequencing technologies are applied. I’m behind in reviewing these papers for you, dear reader, but I hope you’ll click through and take a look at some of these papers if you are interested in the topics.

In the following set of papers we have some nice examples of comparative genomics of closely related species and among a clade of species. The papers mentioned below include our work on the human pathogens Coccidioides and Histoplasma (Sharpton et al) studied at several evolutionary distances, a study on Saccharomycetaceae (Souciet et al) clade of yeast species, and a comparison of two species of Candida (Jackson et al): the commensal and opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans with a very closely related species Candida dubliensis.  There is also a nice comparison of strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae looking at effects of domestication and examples of horizontal transfer.

There is also a report of de novo sequencing of a filamentous fungus using several approaches, traditional Sanger sequencing, 454, and Illumina/Solexa (DiGuistini et al).

Finally, a paper from a few months ago (Ma et al), gives a fantastic look at one of the early branches in the fungal tree – the Mucorales (formerly Zygomycota) – via the genome of Rhizopus oryzae.  This paper is a really excellent example of what we can learn about a group of species by contrasting genomic features in the early branches in the tree with the more well studied Ascomycete and Basidiomycete fungi.  More genome sequences will help us build on these findings and clarify if some of the observations are unique to the lineage or universal aspects of the earliest fungi.

I hope you enjoy!

Novo, M., Bigey, F., Beyne, E., Galeote, V., Gavory, F., Mallet, S., Cambon, B., Legras, J., Wincker, P., Casaregola, S., & Dequin, S. (2009). Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer events revealed by the genome sequence of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0904673106 (via J Heitman)

Jackson, A., Gamble, J., Yeomans, T., Moran, G., Saunders, D., Harris, D., Aslett, M., Barrell, J., Butler, G., Citiulo, F., Coleman, D., de Groot, P., Goodwin, T., Quail, M., McQuillan, J., Munro, C., Pain, A., Poulter, R., Rajandream, M., Renauld, H., Spiering, M., Tivey, A., Gow, N., Barrell, B., Sullivan, D., & Berriman, M. (2009). Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogens Candida dubliniensis and C. albicans Genome Research DOI: 10.1101/gr.097501.109

DiGuistini, S., Liao, N., Platt, D., Robertson, G., Seidel, M., Chan, S., Docking, T., Birol, I., Holt, R., Hirst, M., Mardis, E., Marra, M., Hamelin, R., Bohlmann, J., Breuil, C., & Jones, S. (2009). De novo genome sequence assembly of a filamentous fungus using Sanger, 454 and Illumina sequence data. Genome Biology, 10 (9) DOI: 10.1186/gb-2009-10-9-r94 (open access)

Sharpton, T., Stajich, J., Rounsley, S., Gardner, M., Wortman, J., Jordar, V., Maiti, R., Kodira, C., Neafsey, D., Zeng, Q., Hung, C., McMahan, C., Muszewska, A., Grynberg, M., Mandel, M., Kellner, E., Barker, B., Galgiani, J., Orbach, M., Kirkland, T., Cole, G., Henn, M., Birren, B., & Taylor, J. (2009). Comparative genomic analyses of the human fungal pathogens Coccidioides and their relatives Genome Research DOI: 10.1101/gr.087551.108 (open access)

Souciet, J., Dujon, B., Gaillardin, C., Johnston, M., Baret, P., Cliften, P., Sherman, D., Weissenbach, J., Westhof, E., Wincker, P., Jubin, C., Poulain, J., Barbe, V., Segurens, B., Artiguenave, F., Anthouard, V., Vacherie, B., Val, M., Fulton, R., Minx, P., Wilson, R., Durrens, P., Jean, G., Marck, C., Martin, T., Nikolski, M., Rolland, T., Seret, M., Casaregola, S., Despons, L., Fairhead, C., Fischer, G., Lafontaine, I., Leh, V., Lemaire, M., de Montigny, J., Neuveglise, C., Thierry, A., Blanc-Lenfle, I., Bleykasten, C., Diffels, J., Fritsch, E., Frangeul, L., Goeffon, A., Jauniaux, N., Kachouri-Lafond, R., Payen, C., Potier, S., Pribylova, L., Ozanne, C., Richard, G., Sacerdot, C., Straub, M., & Talla, E. (2009). Comparative genomics of protoploid Saccharomycetaceae Genome Research DOI: 10.1101/gr.091546.109 (open access)

Ma, L., Ibrahim, A., Skory, C., Grabherr, M., Burger, G., Butler, M., Elias, M., Idnurm, A., Lang, B., Sone, T., Abe, A., Calvo, S., Corrochano, L., Engels, R., Fu, J., Hansberg, W., Kim, J., Kodira, C., Koehrsen, M., Liu, B., Miranda-Saavedra, D., O’Leary, S., Ortiz-Castellanos, L., Poulter, R., Rodriguez-Romero, J., Ruiz-Herrera, J., Shen, Y., Zeng, Q., Galagan, J., Birren, B., Cuomo, C., & Wickes, B. (2009). Genomic Analysis of the Basal Lineage Fungus Rhizopus oryzae Reveals a Whole-Genome Duplication PLoS Genetics, 5 (7) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000549 (open access)

Penicillium marneffei project

P.marneffeiWe’re excited that a Penicillium marneffei grant to Mat Fisher and collaborators has been funded by the Welcome Trust. It includes a collaboration with Bignell Lab at Imperial College, our lab, JCVI, and Univ of Melbourne. This project will explore functional and comparative genomics approaches to studying the fungus which primarily infects immune compromised individuals in south-east asia where it is found associated with bamboo rats

Scientists at Imperial College London have received almost £350 000 from the Wellcome Trust, the UK’s largest medical research charity, to study Penicillium marneffei, the only Penicillium fungus to cause serious disease in humans. The researchers aim to find out what makes this particular fungus pathogenic.

Read the rest of the release.