Tag Archives: dictyostelium

Social Slime Mold

Slime molds are interesting organisms that receive surprisingly little attention. Take the case of Dictyostelium discoideum, a single-celled amoeba that, when starved, will aggregate with other D. discoideum amoeba cells in the neighborhood to create a motile, multicellular structure known as a slug. Eventually the slug differentiates into a reproductive structure, with some individuals making a long stalk and others producing spores. In other words, some individuals help other reproduce but do not reproduce themselves.

D. discodium lifecycleBut why form a slug? Why would a single celled organism decide to cooperate with other, genetically different individuals, particularly when it may provide no direct passage of its genes? The evolutionary benefits of kin relationships aside, previous work has shown that slugs do provide multiple benefits to the population as a whole. Continue reading Social Slime Mold