Tag Archives: fungi

Postdoc: Computational Fungal Genomics (Univ of New Zealand)

Postdoctoral Fellow in Computational Fungal Genomics

I am looking for a motivated and productive postdoctoral fellow
to explore the evolutionary implications of interactions between
genome structure, epigenetic modification and gene expression, with a particular focus on the 3D arrangement of unraveled chromosomes in the nucleus. Using a fungal model system with direct agricultural applications (Epichloe festucae), the postdoc will validate genome assemblies using long-read data, build 3D models of genome packing in the nucleus, and explore statistical associations with gene expression using extensive transcriptome data. This position is primarily analytical with an emphasis on producing high-quality publications from existing and ongoing data
collection efforts.

The position requires solid quantitative and computational skills in bioinformatics, with an emphasis on next generation sequencing and genome analysis. At minimum, a practical ability in basic scripting is required. Training in fungal biology and genomics can be provided as needed, and candidates from non-standard research backgrounds with a clear fit to the position are encouraged to apply.

Funding is guaranteed for two years. Salaries are extremely competitive, starting at NZ$68,000 (~US$46,000) per year.

The postdoc will be based in the Cox research group at Massey University, New Zealand. My research team is firmly embedded in the international scientific community, with extensive collaborative links to Australia, Europe and the United States. This position offers a rare opportunity to experience New Zealand¢s unique natural and cultural environment, while undertaking world-leading research. Palmerston North, a university town with a large international community, offers a full range of social and cultural amenities. The city is located close to both mountains and the sea, and presents regular opportunities for hiking, skiing, surfing and adventure sports.

If you have any questions, please contact Prof Murray Cox (m.p.cox@massey.ac.nz). Information about the Cox research group (http://massey.genomicus.com) and the Bio-Protection Research Centre (http://bioprotection.org.nz) are available online.

To apply for this position, upload the following documents (in PDF format) at the official Massey University job website: http://massey-careers.massey.ac.nz/9147/postdoctoral-fellow-in-computational-fungal-genomics

  1.  A brief statement of research interests, qualifications and
    experience.
  2.  A curriculum vitae, including a list of scientific publications.
  3. The names and contact details of three referees willing to provide a confidential letter of recommendation upon request.

Prof Murray Cox
Statistics and Bioinformatics Group
Institute of Fundamental Sciences
Massey University
Palmerston North
NEW ZEALAND

http://massey.genomicus.com
m.p.cox@massey.ac.nz

Postdoctoral Position in Bioinformatics – University of Ottawa

The Corradi Lab is currently seeking a postdoctoral fellow in Bioinformatics to work on projects related to Comparative and Population Genomics. The research will be led by Dr. Nicolas Corradi and carried out in a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) – affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

Website: http://corradilab.weebly.com/

The position is initially funded for one year, with the possibility of renewal for up to three years, depending on performance. The candidate is expected to work on two ongoing lab projects:

  1. Populations genomics of global samples of the bee-pathogen Nosema ceranae

    The recent decline in global populations of honey-bees has been attributed to a many factors, including infections from the microsporidian pathogen Nosema ceranae. Despite the potential threat that this parasite may have on global bee populations, the basic biology of this species is not well understood.
    The present project aims to increase our knowledge of the N. ceranae’s biology by exploring the extent, nature and function of genome diversity that exist both within and between dozens of parasite samples isolated globally (i.e. Spain, France, Turkey, Thailand, USA..etc…).
  2. Population genomics of global isolates of the model plant symbiont, Rhizophagus irregularis

    The Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous plant symbionts that improve the ability of roots to uptake nutrients from soil and provide protection against plant pathogens. These organisms are intriguing as they harbor many nuclei within one cytoplasm throughout their entire life cycle. The genetic organization of these nuclei has been debated for years, but recent genome analyses in our lab are providing essential insights to this debate.

    The proposed projects aims to increase our knowledge of biology and evolution of these curious fungi and critical symbionts by investigating the genome diversity within and across different strains of the model AMF R. irregularis sampled globally.

For specific enquiries please contactDr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Applicants are expected to have a strong background in either comparative genomics or populations genomics. Experience in either population genetics, environmental genomics, metagenomics, or ab-initio gene annotation and programming will be seen as an asset for the final selection of the candidate. Some basic training in bioinformatics (Perl, Python, or R) is desired.

A complete application package includes a CV, a one-page description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. The position opens immediately, and evaluation of applications will continue until a suitable candidate is found.

The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40,000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city. Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life.

Applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Representative publications:

  • Pelin A., Selman M., Laurent Farinelli, Aris-Brosou S. and N. Corradi. 2015. Genome analyses suggest the presence of polyploidy and recent human-driven expansions in eight global populations of the honeybee pathogen Nosema ceranae. Environmental Microbiology
  • Ropars J. and N. Corradi. 2015. Heterokaryotic vs Homokaryotic Mycelium in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Different Techniques, Different Results? New Phytologist
  • Corradi, N. 2015. Microsporidians: Intracellular Parasites Shaped by Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer. Annual Review of Microbiology
  • Riley R., Charron P., Idnurm A., Farinelli F., Yolande D. , Martin F. and N. Corradi. 2014. Extreme diversification of the mating type–high?mobility group (MATA?HMG) gene family in a plant?associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. New Phytologist
  • Tisserant E., Malbreil M. et al. 2013. Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis. PNAS

Postdoc: Populus microbiome/mycobiome at ORNL

New postdoc position in Chris Schadt’s lab at Oak Ridge National Lab

Purpose
The Biosciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (http://www.ornl.gov) is seeking a postdoctoral researcher in the area of microbial ecology. The selected candidate will join an international team of investigators focused on understanding ecology of microbial communities as well as their responses to various anthropogenically induced changes (climate, contaminants, land use, etc.) in multiple systems.

Major Duties/Responsibilities
Design, conduct and interpret laboratory and field based research; lead and contribute to the development of scientific manuscripts and proposals for the Plant-Microbe Interfaces (PMI) project. The available project position will focus on understanding community structure and function of microbes associated with Populus tree species as driven by host genotypic and environmental factors [more at: http://pmi.ornl.gov/]. Research is facilitated by a full range of state-of-the-art equipment/facilities for microbiology, molecular biology, and genomics, in a professional environment with excellent technical support.

Qualifications Required

Qualifications Required: Ph.D. degree in microbiology, ecology, molecular biology, or related field. Applicant should have demonstrated expertise in both modern molecular ecology methods such as quantitative PCR, DNA sequence analyses, as well as working with the informatics tools for microbiome and metagenomics studies. Demonstrated expertise must include a track record of primary contributions to peer-reviewed publications.

Qualifications Preferred: Priority will be given to applicants with a successful history of interdisciplinary, integrative, and innovative research in this area. Familiarity with software tools for next generation DNA sequence analysis of rRNA and metagenomic microbial datasets as well as the ability to program and script in R, Python or Perl to customize such analyses would also be preferred.

Applicants cannot have received the most recent degree more than five years prior to the date of application and must complete all degree requirements before starting their appointment.

Postdoc: Unculturable Protists & Fungi, Single Cell Genomics

Two postdoctoral research positions are available in the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Richards at the University of Exeter, UK.

The project focuses on using environmental sequence data, including meta- genomics and transcriptomics, combined with single cell genomic data to investigate the biology and evolutionary significance of unculturable protist and fungal microbes from marine environments including deep-sea sediments.

One post is focused entirely on bioinformatic based analysis while the second post can include both bioinformatic and laboratory work. However, both applicants should be interested in working with second-generation sequence datasets and feel confident with post genomic analysis including for example: phylogenetic tree reconstruction and metabolic pathway reconstruction.

For more details please see:

https://jobs.exeter.ac.uk/hrpr_webrecruitment/wrd/run/ETREC107GF.open?VACANCY_ID=7490968mXd&WVID=3817591jNg&LANG=USA

https://jobs.exeter.ac.uk/hrpr_webrecruitment/wrd/run/ETREC107GF.open?VACANCY_ID=7733318mXd&WVID=3817591jNg&LANG=USA

This is a Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation funded project and is part of an international collaboration including associated laboratories at the University of British Colombia, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and should include the opportunity for travel

To ask questions or apply please e-mail your CV and contact information for three referees to t.a.richards@exeter.ac.uk . Materials must be received by the 13th November but late applications will be considered until the position is filled.

2012 Fungal Genomes: a review of mycological genomic accomplishments

2012 was certainly a banner year in genome sequence production and publications. The cost of generating the data keeps dropping and the automation for assembly and annotation continues to improve making it possible for a range of groups to publish genomes.

I made a NCBI PubMed Collection of these here Fungal Genomes 2012

Some notable fungal genome publications include

There were also several new insights into the evolution of wood decay fungi derived from new genomes of basidiomycete fungi. This includes

(Now I might have missed a few in my attempt to get this done before holidays overtake me – if so, please post comments or tweets and I’ll be sure to amend the list on pubmed and here.)

A new trend for fungal genome papers can be seen now in the Genome Announcements of Eukaryotic Cell which aim to get the genome data out quickly with a citateable reference. These are short descriptions which I expect will become more popular ways to insure data made public can also be cited. I only counted about 5 published in 2012 but I expect to see a lot more of these in the 2013 either at EC or other journals. I’m sure there will still be some tension between providers making data public as soon as possible and the sponsoring authors’ desire to have first crack at analyzing and publish interpretations and comparison of the genome(s). The bacterial community has been doing this for Genome Reports in the SIGS journal and the Journal of Bacteriology so will see what happens as these small eukaryotic genomes become even easier to produce.

I look forward to exciting year with more of the 1000 Fungal genomes and other JGI  projects start to roll out more genomes.  I also predict there will be many more resequencing datasets published as functional and population genomics. It will also probably be a countdown for what are the last Sanger sequenced genomes and how the many flavors of next generation sequencing will be optimized for generation.  I am hopeful work on automation of annotation and comparisons will be even easier for more people to use and that we start to provide a shared repository of gene predictions.  I’ve just launched the latter and look forward to engaging more people to contribute to this.

Fungal ITS database workshop

We held a workshop last for some of the people using and developing tools and databases for fungal molecular ecology in Fungi in (beautiful) Boulder, CO last week as part of our efforts in the Microbiome of the Built Environment. I am working with my co-organizer and participants to prepare a meeting summary and some descriptions of concrete plans forward. We expect this to make it easier to analyze Fungal ITS sequences in tools like QIIME and provide linkage with resources built around phylogenetic analyses of Fungi. An longer meeting summary will be posted in the coming week after we have all the presentations gathered and the details of the meeting written out.