Tag Archives: microbial ecology

Postdoc: Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma

Postdoctoral Positions Available at the University of Oklahoma

Multiple postdoctoral positions are available at the Institute for Environmental Genomics (IEG) and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, the University of Oklahoma (OU) located in Norman, Oklahoma. The city of Norman is a university town with approximately 100,000 people and easy access to Oklahoma City, OK and Dallas, TX, and the University is working closely with the City on community and economic development. Norman was ranked #6 among the best places to live in 2008 by the CNN/Money Magazine on America’s best small cities.

The Institute for Environmental Genomics, led by Dr. Jizhong Zhou, has state-of-the-art facilities for the study of microbial functional genomics, microbial ecology, metagenomics, and biotechnology development to address fundamental scientific questions.

Three research themes are pursued at IEG:

  1. functional and comparative genomics for understanding gene function, regulation, networks and evolution,
  2. microbial ecology and community genomics for understanding the diversity, composition, structure, function and dynamics of microbial communities related to global change, bioremediation, land use, bioenergy, and agricultural practices as well as their linkages with ecosystem functioning using metagenomics approaches, such as functional gene arrays, high-throughput sequencing, and single cell genomics, and
  3. development of metagenomic and bioinformatic tools for high throughput data analysis and predictive modeling of molecular ecological networks.

IEG researchers have pioneered the development and application of functional gene arrays (e.g., GeoChips), and metagenomic sequencing (e.g., MiSeq sequencing of phylogenetic and functional gene amplicons) approaches for microbial community analysis. IEG is also establishing Raman-based single cell genomics facility.

The selected candidates will apply these technologies to understand the diversity, composition, structure, function, dynamics and interaction of microbial communities, and address fundamental questions related to global change, bioremediation, land use, and agricultural operations.

Candidates with strong background, interests, and experience in microbiology, microbial ecology, soil science, theoretical ecology, and/or metagenomics are encouraged to apply. Additional experience is desirable but not required in bioinformatics, mathematics, computer science, and/or statistics. All individuals will work cooperatively with scientists at different institutions, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Stanford University, University of California at Berkeley, Michigan State University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Arizona, and Georgia Institute of Technology as well as foreign countries like China, Korea and Singapore. Interested individuals should send their curriculum vita, a description of research interests and accomplishments (e.g., publications), and the names and telephone numbers of at least three references to Dr. Jizhong Zhou (jzhou@ou.edu). Salary will be competitive, depending on experience, expertise and skills. Further information can be found on the IEG web site. The University of Oklahoma is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and encourages diversity in the workplace.

A printable flier is available PostdocPositions-OU-13Jun2014.

Yale EEB Postdoc in Microbial Evolutionary Ecology

Yale Postdoctoral Position in Microbial Evolutionary Ecology.

A two- to three-year postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Paul Turner in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. We are seeking a highly motivated and creative individual to participate in ongoing experimental projects relating to eco-evolutionary theory.  These projects concern (i) role of environmental heterogeneity on adaptability of bacteriophages, (ii) role of niche construction in the evolutionary ecology of virus- cancer cell interactions, and (iii) effects of host density on virulence evolution in killer viruses of yeast. The successful candidate will engage in these projects in the first year, while increasingly developing and leading projects of their own design as the position continues. The experiments can utilize high-throughput, automated measures of evolving microorganisms via liquid-handling robotics. Experience with these technologies is preferred, but all strong candidates will be considered.
This postdoctoral position is in association with the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies program in Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics, which is co-directed by David Vasseur, David Post, and Paul Turner. Through this program, the candidate will participate in regular working groups combining international leaders in experimental and theoretical approaches to eco-evolutionary dynamics. More information on the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is available atwww.yale.edu/eeb<http://www.yale.edu/eeb>. For information about postdoctoral appointments at Yale, seehttp://www.yale.edu/postdocs/.  Applications should be emailed to Paul Turner (paul.turner@yale.edu) and include a CV, short statement of research interests, and contact information for three references.  Applications will be considered beginning on May 1, 2014.

Postdoc: U Minnesota Microbial Ecology & Evolution

The May research group at the University of Minnesota seeks to hire two to three post-doctoral associates in the ecology and evolution of plant-associated microbes. Successful applicants will work on an experimental project with global reach as part of a team of ecologists and evolutionary biologists spanning the University of Minnesota’s departments of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior and Plant Pathology. The appointment is for one year (with potential for renewal), to begin as soon as possible. The scientific goal of these positions is to examine the abiotic and biotic predictors and functional significance of fungal, bacterial, and viral symbionts of plant hosts, and determine plant microbiome effects on disease transmission. Experiments will encompass scales ranging from individual hosts and local host communities to regional and global bioclimatic and soil gradients. Projects will include quantification of bacterial, fungal, and viral communities within hosts using high-throughput sequencing and manipulative experiments in both the field and lab to examine the effects of the plant-associated microbial community on host fecundity and pathogen resistance, and on microbial fitness and transmission. Successful applicants will have the opportunity to work with mathematical modelers to use empirically-derived parameter values and test predictive models. We are particularly interested in applicants with metagenomics or organismal expertise in microbial biology and training in community ecology or evolutionary biology. Successful applicants will have experience and ability in laboratory techniques necessary for high-throughput sequencing and quantitative skills for manipulating and analyzing metagenomic or ecological datasets. A conceptual overview of the larger project is described in Borer et al.2013 (found at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2013.08.009).

Questions about these positions should be addressed to Dr. Georgiana May (gmay@umn.edu).

Review of applications will begin on 10 December 2013. Apply for this position (Requisition #188311) via the University of Minnesota Office of Human Resources website:
https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp?postingId=657343

Fungal ITS database workshop

We held a workshop last for some of the people using and developing tools and databases for fungal molecular ecology in Fungi in (beautiful) Boulder, CO last week as part of our efforts in the Microbiome of the Built Environment. I am working with my co-organizer and participants to prepare a meeting summary and some descriptions of concrete plans forward. We expect this to make it easier to analyze Fungal ITS sequences in tools like QIIME and provide linkage with resources built around phylogenetic analyses of Fungi. An longer meeting summary will be posted in the coming week after we have all the presentations gathered and the details of the meeting written out.