Tag Archives: postdoc

Postdoc: Molecular plant-pathogen interactions

A postdoctoral position is available for three years in the field of molecular biology of plant pathogen interactions with the Max Planck research group “Environmental Genomics” headed by Prof. Eva H. Stukenbrock. The Max Planck group is affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön and the Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel in the North of Germany. The position is compensated at TV-L 13 (depending on qualifications), covers 38,7h/week and includes teaching.

Start of the position is January 2016.

Background
We study the evolution and specialization of pathogens to new hosts and new environments, and integrate functional and experimental analyses with evolutionary genomics and transcriptome analyses to dissect the adaptive processes in plant pathogens. The project outlined for this post doc position aims at understanding the underlying molecular basis of host specialization of a fungal plant pathogen. As model system we use a group of closely related grass pathogens, Zymoseptoria spp., including the prominent wheat pathogen Z. tritici. Using evolutionary genomics and comparative transcriptome analyses, we have identified a number of candidate genes, which may have been instrumental for the specialization to distinct grass hosts. This includes genes, which have either diverged extremely between pathogen species, or genes, which show host-specific gene regulation. So far the functional role, of these genes as host determinants is unknown, but will be addressed in the research conducted by the post doc candidate. The post doc candidate will design and apply functional and experimental approaches to dissect the role of candidate genes in Zymoseptoria spp. The study will include the characterization of fungal mutants as well as the role of candidate proteins in host infection. A central goal will be to identify target proteins in the host to link protein function to evolutionary changes in sequences or expression patterns among pathogen species.

Description
The candidate must have a PhD degree in molecular or cell biology or biochemistry and must have a proven record of independent research. Experience with functional genetic studies and fungal transformation are required. Experience in protein-protein interaction assays (e.g. yeast two-hybrid assays), confocal microscopy and phenotypic assays with plant pathogens are desirable. Good presentation, writing, computing and organizational skills and the ability to work independently are a must.

The selected candidate will have the opportunity to collaborate in an interdisciplinary team of biologists (molecular biologists, evolutionary biologists and population geneticists) as well as to pursue unique research in the field of molecular plant-pathogen interactions. For further information regarding the position please contact Eva Stukenbrock (estukenbrock@bot.unikiel.de).

The University strives for a high proportion of women in research and teaching. Applications from qualified female scientists are therefore particularly encouraged. Applications from candidates with migration background are welcome. Disabled persons will be given preference in filling vacancies within the existing legal provisions if equally qualified.

Relevant Literature
Stukenbrock EH, Bataillon T, Duthei JY, Hansen TT, Li R, Zala M, McDonald BA, Wang J, Schierup MH (2011). The making of a new pathogen: Insights from comparative population genomics of the domesticated wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola and its wild sister species. Genome Research 21.12 (2011): 2157-2166

 Poppe, Stephan, et al. “Rapidly Evolving Genes Are Key Players in Host Specialization and Virulence of the Fungal Wheat Pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici (Mycosphaerella graminicola).” PLoS Pathog 11.7 (2015): e1005055.

Dong, Suomeng, et al. “Effector specialization in a lineage of the Irish potato famine pathogen.” Science 343.6170 (2014): 552-555.

Application Interested candidates should send a motivation letter including a description of current research directions, an up-to-date CV (excluding photo), together with the names and the contact information of at least two references to Eva H. Stukenbrock as pdf. Application deadline is November 13th, 2015.

Postdoc: Population genomics and speciation in fungal pathogens

Post-doc position in genomics of introgressions in fungal pathogens

[from EvolDir]

We invite applications for a postdoctoral position in the Research Institute of Horticulture and Seeds. The position is for 1 year starting as soon as January 2016.

The Postdoc will conduct his research in the field of population genomics of secondary contacts and introgression in two fungal pathogens: Venturia inaequalis, an ascomycete responsible of the apple scab, and the Scedosporium apiospermum species complex which is responsible for pulmonary infections in children with cystic fibrosis.

The Postdoc will have to identify genomics regions involved in introgression between divergent populations of Venturia inaequalis and Scedosporium species. Indeed, secondary contacts between divergent genomics pools may favour the creation of new genetic combination of loci involved in pathogenicity. New hybrids should then exhibit hitherto unseen epidemiological properties. The Postdoc will work in a team involved in several projects of genetics or genomics, functional genomics, and evolutionary epidemiology (IRHS – ECOFUN team).

Using resequenced genomes (89 for V. inaequalis and 23 for the Scedosporium species complex), the Postdoc will be in charge of the assembling, genome aligning and SNP calling, prior to population genomics analyses. The Postdoc will have to infer evolutionary histories at the interspecies and species levels for both datasets, identify and characterise genomic regions involved in introgressions. He [or she] will possibly collaborate with all the researchers involved in this project : population geneticists, microbiologists, functional genomicists, phytopathologists.

We are looking for a candidate with a keen interest for population genomics and evolutionary history in structured populations. The candidate must hold a PhD in population genomics with strong skills in bioinformatics (manipulation of NGS data, assembling, demographic inferences). Good written communication skill and ability to work as part of a team are required.

How to apply:
Applicants should submit

  1.  a cover letter describing their research interests and background,
  2.  a detailed CV (including list of publications), and
  3. the contact details of three references to bruno.lecam@angers.inra.fr or christophe.lemaire@univ-angers.fr. The cover letter should also include possible starting dates.

NSF Poststdoc opportunity for Research using biological collections

Earlier this year the NSF released a postdoc opportunity for research to use Biological Collections. In particular these can be strain collections and stock collections. The US Culture Collection Network is a Research Coordination Network which brings together many collaborating culture collections. You can find many of the U.S. living collections there include fungal centers like the Phaff Yeast Collection and Fungal Genetics Stock Center. The Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium at U Arizona under Elizabeth Arnold‘s leadership has developed a rich collection of endophyte fungi which would be another excellent environment to work with these resources. Kyria Boundy-Mills who is the curator of the Phaff collection has also expressed interest in either hosting or helping working with a postdoc on this. There is tremendous biodiversity of the fungi available in these and other culture collections so seems like a great chance to tap into these.
This would be a great opportunity to link work in the 1000 Fungal genomes project and sampling from culture collections (not just sequencing, but growing and characterizing growth, carbon source utilization and integrating that with predictions made from genome comparisons). If this is something interesting to you – do get in touch with some of the curators at these collections, but also my lab and I expect many other labs would be interested hosting someone to work on these questions that take advantage of these living collections of fungi.
Proposals are to be submitted by potential post docs. Submitter must be a US citizen or US permanent resident. The next deadline is November 3, 2015Funding total for the program is $8 million, 40 awards anticipated, up to two years. Here’s some key text from the solicitation:

Competitive Area 2. Postdoctoral Research Fellowships Using Biological Collections.

Biological research collections represent the documented scientific history of life on Earth, and the U.S. museum community alone curates over a billion specimens ranging from bacteria to plants, insects and vertebrates, as well as fossils. Across the globe, collections represent critical infrastructure and support essential research activities in biology and its related fields. Scientists, government agencies, industry and citizens utilize collections to document and understand evolution and biodiversity, study global change, formulate advice on conservation planning, educate the general public, improve interactions between sciences, and devise new practical applications from science to every day life. New technologies supported by NSF in digitization, such as the Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) program, are making collections and their associated data, whether they are physical specimens, text, images, sounds, or data tables, searchable in online databases. Despite this clear progress in improving access to physical specimens and their associated metadata, collections remain under-utilized for answering contemporary questions about fundamental aspects of biological processes. Thus, collections are poised to become a critical resource for developing transformative approaches to address key questions in biology and potentially develop applications that extend biology to physical, mathematical, engineering and social sciences. This postdoctoral track seeks transformative approaches that use biological collections in highly innovative ways to address grand challenges in biology. Priority may be given to applicants who integrate biological collections and associated resources with other types of data in an effort to forge new insight into areas traditionally funded by BIO. Examples of key questions in biology of interest include, but are not limited to, links between genotype and phenotype, evolutionary developmental biology, comparative approaches in functional and developmental neurobiology, and the biophysics of nanostructures. Using collections as a resource for grand challenge questions in biology is expected to present new opportunities to advance understanding of biological processes and systems, inspiring new discoveries in areas with relevance to other disciplines with overlapping interests in biological systems. Applicants must document access to the selected collection(s) in the research and training plan.

Postdoctoral Position in Bioinformatics – University of Ottawa

The Corradi Lab is currently seeking a postdoctoral fellow in Bioinformatics to work on projects related to Comparative and Population Genomics. The research will be led by Dr. Nicolas Corradi and carried out in a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) – affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

Website: http://corradilab.weebly.com/

The position is initially funded for one year, with the possibility of renewal for up to three years, depending on performance. The candidate is expected to work on two ongoing lab projects:

  1. Populations genomics of global samples of the bee-pathogen Nosema ceranae

    The recent decline in global populations of honey-bees has been attributed to a many factors, including infections from the microsporidian pathogen Nosema ceranae. Despite the potential threat that this parasite may have on global bee populations, the basic biology of this species is not well understood.
    The present project aims to increase our knowledge of the N. ceranae’s biology by exploring the extent, nature and function of genome diversity that exist both within and between dozens of parasite samples isolated globally (i.e. Spain, France, Turkey, Thailand, USA..etc…).
  2. Population genomics of global isolates of the model plant symbiont, Rhizophagus irregularis

    The Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous plant symbionts that improve the ability of roots to uptake nutrients from soil and provide protection against plant pathogens. These organisms are intriguing as they harbor many nuclei within one cytoplasm throughout their entire life cycle. The genetic organization of these nuclei has been debated for years, but recent genome analyses in our lab are providing essential insights to this debate.

    The proposed projects aims to increase our knowledge of biology and evolution of these curious fungi and critical symbionts by investigating the genome diversity within and across different strains of the model AMF R. irregularis sampled globally.

For specific enquiries please contactDr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Applicants are expected to have a strong background in either comparative genomics or populations genomics. Experience in either population genetics, environmental genomics, metagenomics, or ab-initio gene annotation and programming will be seen as an asset for the final selection of the candidate. Some basic training in bioinformatics (Perl, Python, or R) is desired.

A complete application package includes a CV, a one-page description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. The position opens immediately, and evaluation of applications will continue until a suitable candidate is found.

The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40,000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city. Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life.

Applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradi@uottawa.ca).

Representative publications:

  • Pelin A., Selman M., Laurent Farinelli, Aris-Brosou S. and N. Corradi. 2015. Genome analyses suggest the presence of polyploidy and recent human-driven expansions in eight global populations of the honeybee pathogen Nosema ceranae. Environmental Microbiology
  • Ropars J. and N. Corradi. 2015. Heterokaryotic vs Homokaryotic Mycelium in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Different Techniques, Different Results? New Phytologist
  • Corradi, N. 2015. Microsporidians: Intracellular Parasites Shaped by Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer. Annual Review of Microbiology
  • Riley R., Charron P., Idnurm A., Farinelli F., Yolande D. , Martin F. and N. Corradi. 2014. Extreme diversification of the mating type–high?mobility group (MATA?HMG) gene family in a plant?associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. New Phytologist
  • Tisserant E., Malbreil M. et al. 2013. Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis. PNAS

Postdoc: Oslo Fungal molecular ecology

Three year position as Postdoctoral Research Fellow in fungal molecular ecology available at the University of Oslo, Norway:

Soil fungi play important functional roles in forest ecosystems; while saprotrophic taxa are essential for organic matter decomposition; mycorrhizal root-associated fungi mediate the link between living plants and the below-ground community. Recent studies indicate that plant-fungi interactions through mycorrhiza affect the efficiency of decomposition by fungi, and works as a main driver for soil carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems. The goal of this project (MycoSoil), which is funded by the Norwegian Research Council, is to make fundamental progress in the understanding of the community ecology and functions of fungi in boreal forest soils, how they are organized spatiotemporally and how they influence on carbon sequestration processes. We will take advantage of linking the project to two long-term surveys of boreal forests. State-of-the art DNA metabarcoding and metatranscriptomics approaches will be used to analyze spatiotemporal variation in the soil fungal communities.

For more information see http://uio.easycruit.com/vacancy/1352849/96323?iso=no or contact Håvard Kauserud at haavarka@ibv.uio.no

Postdoc: Comparative genomics and bioinformatics

Postdoc position in comparative genomics and bioinformatics

Applications are invited for a bioinformatics postdoctoral position in ?the research group of Laszlo G Nagy (Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Biological Research Center, Szeged, Hungary). We are now looking to hire new people with a background in bioinformatics, phylogenetics or fungal evolution. The Lab offers excellent training opportunities in fungal comparative genomics, cutting edge projects, abundant funding, an inspiring atmosphere and extensive collaborator network.

The primary focus of the lab is understanding the general principles of convergent evolution and fungal multicellularity through comparative genomics, transcriptomics and single-cell transcriptomics of multicellular fruiting bodies in Basidiomycetes. Fruiting bodies represent some of the most complex morphological structures found in fungi, yet, their developmental and evolutionary origins are hardly known. Complex fruiting bodies have evolved independently several times in the Basidiomycetes, offering an excellent model system to study the genetic mechanisms of convergent evolution.

The successful Candidate has:

  • PhD in bioinformatics, evolutionary biology, mycology or other relevant field
  • Experience in genomics, Perl and/or Python scripting
  • Good team player traits
  • Experience in working with fungi is a plus

Contact and application – The starting date of the project is September 2015. The position will last for one year with the possibility of extension up to 4 years. If interested, send a motivation letter along with your CV to Laszlo Nagy (lnagy@brc.hu).


Dr. Laszlo Nagy
Fungal Evolution & Genomics Lab
Synthetic and Systems Biology Unit, Institute of Biochemistry
Biological Research Center, HAS
Hungary

http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/sysbiol/nagy-laszlo-lab-index.html

Postdoc: Agaricus bisporus genomics and transcriptomics

Applications are invited for a bioinformatics postdoctoral position in
the research group of David Fitzpatrick (Department of Biology, Maynooth University, Ireland). My group is interested in genomics,
transcripomics, proteomics and molecular evolution of fungal species.
The project start date is the 1st of February 2015 and sets out to
investigate the genome of Agaricus bisporus.

Agaricus bisporus strain A15 is the most widely cultivated white
mushroom strain in Europe. Currently there are significant financial and time costs associated with ensuring A15 inoculum is genetically
identical to parent culture. This project sets out to undertake an
extensive genetic analysis of A. bisporus A15, via genomic and
transcriptomic sequence analysis. Ideally this genetic characterisation will act as the starting point for development of a molecular diagnostic test to determine if new inoculum is genetically identically to parent culture. We also aim to produce a high quality map for the genome of A. bisporus A15. This will be invaluable for future breeding of new A. bisporus strains.

The position will last for 18 months, with the possibility of extension.
I am looking for somebody who has experience in genome/transcriptomic assembly and experience in handling large datasets. The successful candidate will have published in peer reviewed literature and have their PhD awarded by the start of the project.

Send a CV and covering letter to david.fitzpatrick@nuim.ie with the
subject line “post-doc position on Agaricus bisporus ”


Dr. David Fitzpatrick
Genome Evolution Laboratory
Department of Biology
Maynooth University
Maynooth
Co. Kildare
Ireland.

E: david.fitzpatrick@nuim.ie
T: +353-1-7086844
F: +353-1-7083845
M: +353-860681715
W: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/people/david-fitzpatrick
W: http://bioinf.nuim.ie/

Postdoc: Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma

Postdoctoral Positions Available at the University of Oklahoma

Multiple postdoctoral positions are available at the Institute for Environmental Genomics (IEG) and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, the University of Oklahoma (OU) located in Norman, Oklahoma. The city of Norman is a university town with approximately 100,000 people and easy access to Oklahoma City, OK and Dallas, TX, and the University is working closely with the City on community and economic development. Norman was ranked #6 among the best places to live in 2008 by the CNN/Money Magazine on America’s best small cities.

The Institute for Environmental Genomics, led by Dr. Jizhong Zhou, has state-of-the-art facilities for the study of microbial functional genomics, microbial ecology, metagenomics, and biotechnology development to address fundamental scientific questions.

Three research themes are pursued at IEG:

  1. functional and comparative genomics for understanding gene function, regulation, networks and evolution,
  2. microbial ecology and community genomics for understanding the diversity, composition, structure, function and dynamics of microbial communities related to global change, bioremediation, land use, bioenergy, and agricultural practices as well as their linkages with ecosystem functioning using metagenomics approaches, such as functional gene arrays, high-throughput sequencing, and single cell genomics, and
  3. development of metagenomic and bioinformatic tools for high throughput data analysis and predictive modeling of molecular ecological networks.

IEG researchers have pioneered the development and application of functional gene arrays (e.g., GeoChips), and metagenomic sequencing (e.g., MiSeq sequencing of phylogenetic and functional gene amplicons) approaches for microbial community analysis. IEG is also establishing Raman-based single cell genomics facility.

The selected candidates will apply these technologies to understand the diversity, composition, structure, function, dynamics and interaction of microbial communities, and address fundamental questions related to global change, bioremediation, land use, and agricultural operations.

Candidates with strong background, interests, and experience in microbiology, microbial ecology, soil science, theoretical ecology, and/or metagenomics are encouraged to apply. Additional experience is desirable but not required in bioinformatics, mathematics, computer science, and/or statistics. All individuals will work cooperatively with scientists at different institutions, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Stanford University, University of California at Berkeley, Michigan State University, University of Florida, University of New Mexico, University of Arizona, and Georgia Institute of Technology as well as foreign countries like China, Korea and Singapore. Interested individuals should send their curriculum vita, a description of research interests and accomplishments (e.g., publications), and the names and telephone numbers of at least three references to Dr. Jizhong Zhou (jzhou@ou.edu). Salary will be competitive, depending on experience, expertise and skills. Further information can be found on the IEG web site. The University of Oklahoma is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and encourages diversity in the workplace.

A printable flier is available PostdocPositions-OU-13Jun2014.

Postdoc: Yeast Evolutionary Genomics

The Hittinger Lab, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison is seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral researcher with an exceptional background in bioinformatics, functional genomics, or evolutionary genomics. Experience analyzing Illumina sequence data, computer programming proficiency, and training in ecological or evolutionary genetics are highly desirable.

The lab recently received generous funding for yeast
evolutionary genomics research from the National Science
Foundation’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program and the Pew Charitable Trusts.

With Antonis Rokas (Vanderbilt) and Cletus P. Kurtzman (USDA), the Y1000+ Project seeks to sequence and analyze the to complete genomes of all ~1,000 known species of Saccharomycotina yeasts and determine the genetic basis of their metabolic, ecological, and functional diversification. Yeasts are genetically more diverse than vertebrates and have remarkable metabolic dexterity, but most remain minimally characterized. They compete vigorously for nutrients in every continent and biome and can produce everything from beer to oil. The history of yeasts is recorded in their genome sequences. Now is the time to read it and tell their story!

The Hittinger Lab has diverse funding for other basic and applied research from NSF, DOE, and USDA, but we are specifically expanding our basic research in ecological and evolutionary genomics.

The complete advertisement and application instructions can be found here – The precise start date is flexible, but candidates should apply by November 30th to receive full consideration.

Sincerely,

Chris Todd Hittinger, Assistant Professor of Genetics
Genome Center of Wisconsin
J. F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution
University of Wisconsin-Madison
425-G Henry Mall, 2434 Genetics/Biotechnology Center
Madison, WI  53706-1580
cthittinger@wisc.edu, (608) 890-2586
http://hittinger.genetics.wisc.edu

Postdoc: Aspergillus Pathogenesis and Immune Activation Dartmouth

A postdoctoral position is available to study the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and host defense during Aspergillus fumigatus infection. The project will focus on fungal and host factors that are responsive to in vivo oxygen levels which subsequently modulate virulence and host inflammatory responses in clinically relevant models of aspergillosis.

Two years of initial funding are guaranteed for generating data and applying for independent funding. Applicants should have a PhD in microbiology, immunology or closely related field. Experience in molecular mycology and/or immunology are preferred, but those interested in mycology from other backgrounds are welcome to apply.

The Cramer Laboratory is located at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. The position affords the opportunity to utilize state-of-the-art facilities and resources associated with a major research and teaching institution, while enjoying the quality of life characteristic of the upper valley in New England.

For further information on our institution and department see: http://geiselmed.dartmouth.edu and http://geiselmed.dartmouth.edu/microbio/. For the Cramer laboratory, see http://www.thecramerlab.com and the Dartmouth Lung Biology Center: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~lbcobre/.

PDF: CramerDartmouth_Postdoc_2014